Susan Herndon & Greg Jacobs on Sat, January 23, 2016

Susan Herndon

Playing around 200 gigs a year for more than a decade, Susan Herndon has retained that true troubadour’s ethos, sharing her passion for song and stirring thousands of kindred spirits throughout Oklahoma, Texas and the American heartland.

With an engaging smile and graceful charm, she touches upon themes both universal and deeply personal, from longing and loneliness, to home, family, faded memories and hopeful dreams. And she connects with her listeners in a voice that conveys equal parts savory innocence and knowing savoir-faire.

Herndon draws from a reservoir of original material spanning five albums that have long found her sliding with ease from genre to genre. iTunes may soon run out of apt descriptors for Herndon’s music; her releases have been termed ‘blues,’ ‘country,’ ‘indie rock,’ ‘jazz’ and ‘pop.’ One moment she’s covering a Dylan classic in French with delicate fingerpicking on her guitar and the next may find her sitting at a keyboard paying homage to any number of fellow Oklahoma songsmiths, such as Woody Guthrie, Jimmy Webb, Leon Russell or J.J. Cale. All in an inspired style uniquely Herndonesque.

Greg Jacobs

As part of a group of “red dirt” musicians who migrated to Stillwater in the late 1970’s – a rag-tag outfit that includes Jimmy LaFave, Tom Skinner, Bob Childers and the Red Dirt Rangers – Checotah singer/songwriter Greg Jacobs helped set the standard for great Okie songwriting. His landmark CD, “Reclining With Age” brought Jacobs to an audience far beyond his Oklahoma home, and his new recording, “Lucky Live,” a mostly best-of live collection, promises to be his most successful collection. “Lucky Live” features Travis Linville, John Fullbright and Terry Buffalo Ware assisting Jacobs on most of his best known songs including “Farmer’s Luck” “A Little Rain Will Do” “Okie Wind” “Enjoy The Ride” “I’m Not Afraid Of The Blues” and Patient Man,” as well as newer songs “C Chord” “From Here To Tulsa” and “Eyes Of A Child.” Some call Jacobs the red dirt crooner because of his easy goin’ style, and that just might be right. He is the smoothest of all the red dirt troubadours, laying down a solid Okie groove, on songs that are both historic and personal.